Black Children's Books & Authors

"Black children need to see their lives reflected in the books they read. If they don't, they won't feel welcome in the world of literature. The lives of African-Americans are rich and diverse, and the books our children read should reflect that."- Valerie Wilson Wesley

A. Philip Randolph: The Religious Journey of an African American Labor Leader

Cynthia Taylor

A. Philip Randolph, founder of the Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters, was one of the most effective black trade unionists in America. Once known as “the most dangerous black man in America,” he was a radical journalist, a labor leader, and a pioneer of civil rights strategies. His protégé Bayard Rustin noted that, “With the exception of W.E.B. Du Bois, he was probably the greatest civil rights leader of the twentieth century until Martin Luther King.”


Scholarship has traditionally portrayed Randolph as an atheist and anti-religious, his connections to African American religion either ignored or misrepresented. Taylor places Randolph within the context of American religious history and uncovers his complex relationship to African American religion. She demonstrates that Randolph’s religiosity covered a wide spectrum of liberal Protestant beliefs, from a religious humanism on the left, to orthodox theological positions on the right, never straying far from his African Methodist roots.”

Author’s Corner: An Interview with Cynthia Taylor

— 15 hours ago with 10 notes
#black authors  #cynthia taylor  #a. philip randolph  #black labor history 

A. Philip Randolph: Integration in the Workplace

Kirkus Review:

This earnest installment in “”The History of the Civil Rights Movement”” series succeeds in capturing the personality of a spirited African-American socialist leader. Poignant examples of the humiliations that shaped Randolph’s life include his ejection from a public library whose laden shelves seemed like miracles to a boy who had pored over every book in his parents’ home. As co-founder of The Messenger, he tried but failed to organize black unions until his ten-year-long sustained efforts on behalf of the Pullman Porters led to new legislation; he went on to tackle other issues of segregation, including that in the military…Wright’s passion for her subject is never in doubt. Useful. B&W photos; chronology; bibliography; index.

Sarah E. Wright

helped organize the First and the Second National Conference of Black Writers and the Congress of American Writers. She was president of Pen & Brush, Inc., the oldest professional organization of women in the United States. She was a member of the Harlem Writer’s Guild, PEN, the Authors Guild, and the International Women’s Writing Guild. She has received numerous awards, including two MacDowell Colony fellowships for creative writing, the 1975 CAPS Award for Fiction, the 1976 Howard University Novelist-Poet Award, the Middle Atlantic Writers Association Award, and the Zora Neale Hurston Award…read more

— 15 hours ago with 9 notes
#black authors  #sarah e. wright  #a. philip randolph  #black labor history 

Hey Boy! Hey George! The Pullman Porter: A Pullman Porter’s Story

Johnnie F. Kirvin

A powerful journey of a black man’s dreams and dilemmas, fears and perseverance. Cerebral and racy, historical and reflective, “Hey boy! Hey George!” The Pullman Porter chronicles Kirvin’s experience as a Pullman porter during WWII. Some viewed Pullman porters as prestigious breadwinners, while others viewed them as glorified servants, but what was it really like to deliver a standard of excellence while trying to survive and earn a living under Jim Crow segregation laws? Experience Kirvin’s challenges firsthand, then decide for yourself.

Photos

— 15 hours ago with 16 notes
#black authors  #pullman porters  #johnnie f. kirvin  #black history  #labor history 

A Long Hard Journey: The Story of the Pullman Porter
Fredrick L & Patricia C. McKissack
More than just the story of the Pullman porters, this volume recounts the saga of Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters, first major black labor union to be admitted to the AFL. Organized by A. Phillip Randolph just after the Civil War, the union brought together many freed slaves who had been hired by George Pullman to pamper the passengers in his sleeping cars.
Seasoned with poetry, song, black-and-white historical photographs and the personal reminiscences of porters and their wives, the text is full and engaging. It offers an excellent introduction to labor history.

A Long Hard Journey: The Story of the Pullman Porter

Fredrick L & Patricia C. McKissack

More than just the story of the Pullman porters, this volume recounts the saga of Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters, first major black labor union to be admitted to the AFL. Organized by A. Phillip Randolph just after the Civil War, the union brought together many freed slaves who had been hired by George Pullman to pamper the passengers in his sleeping cars.

Seasoned with poetry, song, black-and-white historical photographs and the personal reminiscences of porters and their wives, the text is full and engaging. It offers an excellent introduction to labor history.

— 15 hours ago with 4 notes
#black authors  #patricia mckissack  #fredrick mckissack  #pullman porters  #black history  #labor history 

Between Good and Ghetto: African American Girls and Inner-City Violence

With an outward gaze focused on a better future, Between Good and Ghetto reflects the social world of inner city African American girls and how they manage threats of personal violence. Drawing on personal encounters, traditions of urban ethnography, Black feminist thought, gender studies, and feminist criminology, Nikki Jones gives readers a richly descriptive and compassionate account of how African American girls negotiate schools and neighborhoods governed by the so-called “code of the street”—the form of street justice that governs violence in distressed urban areas. She reveals the multiple strategies they use to navigate interpersonal and gender-specific violence and how they reconcile the gendered dilemmas of their adolescence. Illuminating struggles for survival within this group, Between Good and Ghetto encourages others to move African American girls toward the center of discussions of “the crisis” in poor, urban neighborhoods.

Nikki Jones…

is an associate professor in the Department of African American Studies at the University of California, Berkeley. She is also a faculty affiliate with the Center for the Study of Law and Society. Her areas of expertise include urban ethnography, race and ethnic relations and criminology and criminal justice, with a special emphasis on the intersection of race, gender, and justice…continue reading

— 16 hours ago with 34 notes
#black authors  #nikki jones  #african american girls and inner-city violence 

The Miter Fits Just Fine! A Story about the Rt. Rev. Barbara Clementine Harris: The First Woman Bishop in the Anglican Communion

Mark Bozzuti-Jones 

In this charming biography especially for young people, Mark Bozzuti-Jones gives us a warm and caring glimpse of Barbara C. Harris, the first woman to be ordained a bishop in the Anglican Communion.

Based on conversations with Bishop Harris, her family, and her close friends, Bozzuti-Jones addresses complex issues of faith, discrimination, and the presence of God in ordinary events. This is an excellent gift for confirmation or baptism, or for anyone curious to know the answer to the question, “Where do Bishops come from?”—an engaging story of the ordinary and extraordinary life of a remarkable bishop.

— 16 hours ago with 10 notes
#black authors  #mark bozzuti-jones  #rev. barbara clementine harris  #black women in history 

Young Cornrows Callin Out the Moon

Who needs a backyard when there are brownstone steps, double dutch, and freeze tag beneath the sizzling summer sun? The jingling bell of the ice cream truck mingles with laughter and sidewalk rhymes. Frosty lemonade from the corner store and tight cornrows beat the heat with style. There’s nothing like summer in the city with friends, family, and a child’s imagination for company. Ruth Forman offers a poetic testament to childhood, language, and play, and Cbabi Bayoc’s richly hued paintings bring the streets of South Philadelphia to vivid life.

Ruth Forman…

is the author of three award-winning books: poetry collections We Are the Young Magicians (Beacon, 1993) and Renaissance, (Beacon, 1997) and children’s book, Young Cornrows Callin Out the Moon (Children’s Book Press, 2007). She is the recipient of the Barnard New Women Poets Prize, The Pen Oakland Josephine Miles Literary Award, The Durfee Artist Fellowship, a DC Commission on the Arts and Humanities Artist Fellowship, the National Council of Teachers of English Notable Book Award, and recognition by The American Library Association…continue reading

— 16 hours ago with 16 notes
#black authors  #ruth forman  #children's books 

Sunday Best
A boy tells about his daily activities and explains why he thinks Sunday is the best day of the week.
Juwanda G. Ford…
A native of New Orleans, Louisiana, Juwanda G. Ford was born in 1967 and wrote her first book, My Book of Poems, at the age of six; she still has the book, and brings it to schools when she visits. Ford grew up in a poor and often dangerous neighborhood in which her own mother was shot and killed when Ford was just 11; she was raised by her grandmother, and escaped into a world of books and imagination. Ford went on to receive her Bachelor of Arts degree from Austin College and a graduate degree in publishing from Oxford Brookes University in England…continue reading

Sunday Best

A boy tells about his daily activities and explains why he thinks Sunday is the best day of the week.

Juwanda G. Ford…

A native of New Orleans, Louisiana, Juwanda G. Ford was born in 1967 and wrote her first book, My Book of Poems, at the age of six; she still has the book, and brings it to schools when she visits. Ford grew up in a poor and often dangerous neighborhood in which her own mother was shot and killed when Ford was just 11; she was raised by her grandmother, and escaped into a world of books and imagination. Ford went on to receive her Bachelor of Arts degree from Austin College and a graduate degree in publishing from Oxford Brookes University in England…continue reading

— 16 hours ago with 12 notes
#black authors  #juwanda g. ford  #sunday best  #children's books 
"Not all black people passively accept white supremacist thinking. However, it impacts on all our lives. We must be ever vigilant so that we do not end up evaluating each other using a standard of measurement created by white supremacist thinking. Often individual successful black people work in predominantly white settings. In those environments we may often be treated by white folks as though we are special, different from other black people whom they may perceive in stereotypical ways. Their behavior is aimed at breaking our sense of solidarity with other black people. When this happens individual black folks often internalize the notion that they are “superior” to most of their black peers. If such thinking prevails, they will often behave with the same racialized contempt that racist white individuals deploy. This is of course a strategy of re-subordination enacted to keep in place racial hierarchies that put white folks on top. Self-loving black people work to fend off attempts by white colleagues to pit them against other black people."
bell hooks, “salvation: black people and love”  (via thenegrotude)

(Source: daniellemertina, via chemman9)

— 1 week ago with 244 notes

Just made a mistake a reblogged a post about puberty. Oops : /

Sorry followers…

— 2 weeks ago
#oops  #need glasses  #deleting