Black Children's Books & Authors

"Black children need to see their lives reflected in the books they read. If they don't, they won't feel welcome in the world of literature. The lives of African-Americans are rich and diverse, and the books our children read should reflect that."- Valerie Wilson Wesley

Ties That Bind: The Story of an Afro-Cherokee Family in Slavery and Freedom

This beautifully written book tells the haunting saga of a quintessentially American family. It is the story of Shoe Boots, a famed Cherokee warrior and successful farmer, and Doll, an African slave he acquired in the late 1790s. Over the next thirty years, Shoe Boots and Doll lived together as master and slave and also as lifelong partners who, with their children and grandchildren, experienced key events in American history—including slavery, the Creek War, the founding of the Cherokee Nation and subsequent removal of Native Americans along the Trail of Tears, and the Civil War. This is the gripping story of their lives, in slavery and in freedom.

Meticulously crafted from historical and literary sources, Ties That Bind vividly portrays the members of the Shoeboots family. Doll emerges as an especially poignant character, whose life is mostly known through the records of things done to her—her purchase, her marriage, the loss of her children—but also through her moving petition to the federal government for the pension owed to her as Shoe Boots’s widow. A sensitive rendition of the hard realities of black slavery within Native American nations, the book provides the fullest picture we have of the myriad complexities, ironies, and tensions among African Americans, Native Americans, and whites in the first half of the nineteenth century.

The House on Diamond Hill: A Cherokee Plantation Story

At the turn of the nineteenth century, James Vann, a Cherokee chief and entrepreneur, established Diamond Hill in Georgia, the most famous plantation in the southeastern Cherokee Nation. In this first full-length study to reconstruct the history of the plantation, Tiya Miles tells the story of Diamond Hill’s founding, its flourishing, its takeover by white land-lottery winners on the eve of the Cherokee Removal, its decay, and ultimately its renovation in the 1950s.

This moving multiracial history sheds light on the various cultural communities that interacted within the plantation boundaries—from elite Cherokee slaveholders to Cherokee subsistence farmers, from black slaves of various ethnic backgrounds to free blacks from the North and South, from German-speaking Moravian missionaries to white southern skilled laborers. Moreover, the book includes rich portraits of the women of these various communities. Vividly written and extensively researched, this history illuminates gender, class, and cross-racial relationships on the southern frontier

Tiya Miles…

is a professor at the University of Michigan in the Department of American Culture, Department of Afro-American and African Studies, Department of History, Department of Women Studies, and Native American Studies Program. Her research and creative interests include African American and Native American interrelated and comparative histories (especially 19th century); Black, Native, and U.S. women’s histories; and African American and Native American women’s literature…continue reading

— 2 days ago with 108 notes
#black authors  #tiya miles  #black history  #native american history  #slavery 

shamelesshipsterscum:

medievalpoc:

The Black Count is Being Adapted for a New Film!

Tom Reiss’s The Black Count, which details the true story of Général Thomas Alexandre Dumas (father of author Alexandre Dumas), is being adapted into a film directed by Cary Fukunaga (director of HBO’s True Detective).

No actors have been named so far, although some people are already speculating that Howard Charles may be considered for the lead. He’s known for playing the role of Porthos on the BBC’s Three Musketeers:

image

You can read a bit more about this story and hear an interview with the book’s author here at Indiewire.

You can read an excerpt of The Black Count here.

sweeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeet!!!

— 2 days ago with 2485 notes

Lucky Beans

Like so many people during the Great Depression of the 1930s, Marshall Loman’s dad has lost his job. There’s little money, but there are plenty of beans-in fact, Ma cooks them for supper every single night! Beans start looking better when Marshall sees the contest posted in the furniture store window. HOW MANY BEANS ARE IN THE JAR? WIN THIS BRAND NEW SEWING MACHINE! Ma needs that sewing machine-but how can Loman possibly guess right? Then Marshall remembers something he learned in arithmetic class. Becky Birtha’s engaging story, based on her grandmother’s memories of Depression years in the African American community, is illustrated by Nicole Tadgell’s expressive paintings.

Becky Birtha…

has written two picture books for children–two historical, culturally rich, family-inspired picture books that would be valuable additions to any classroom or personal library…read more at The Brown Bookshelf

— 2 days ago with 15 notes
#black authors  #becky birtha  #children's books  #the great depression  #historical fiction 

Jumped

Rita Williams-Garcia

The wrong angle

Trina: “Hey,” I say, though I don’t really know them. The boyed-up basketball girl barely moves. The others, her girls, step aside. It’s okay if they don’t speak. I know how it is. They can’t all be Trina.

Dominique: Some stupid little flit cuts right in between us and is like, “Hey.” Like she don’t see I’m here and all the space around me is mines. I slam my fist into my other hand because she’s good as jumped.

Leticia: Why would I get involved in Trina’s life when I don’t know for sure if I saw what I thought I saw? Who is to say I wasn’t seeing it from the wrong angle?

Acclaimed author Rita Williams-Garcia intertwines the lives of three very different teens in this fast-paced, gritty narrative about choices and the impact that even the most seemingly insignificant ones can have. Weaving in and out of the girls’ perspectives, readers will find themselves not with one intimate portrayal but three.

“I learned to read early, and was aware of events going on as I grew up in the 60s. In the midst of real events, I daydreamed and wrote stories. Writing stories for young people is my passion and my mission. Teens will read. They hunger for stories that engage them and reflect their images and experiences.” Rita Williams-Garcia

— 2 days ago with 6 notes
#black authors  #children's books  #rita williams-garcia  #teen girls 

Yummy: The Last Days of a Southside Shorty

In August of 1994, 11-year-old Robert “Yummy” Sandifer — nicknamed for his love of sweets — fired a gun at a group of rival gang members, accidentally killing a neighborhood girl, Shavon Dean. Police searched Chicago’s Southside for three days before finding Yummy dead in a railway tunnel, killed by members of the drug gang he’d sought to impress. The story made such an impact that Yummy appeared on the cover of TIME magazine, drawing national attention to the problems of inner city youth in America.

Yummy: The Last Days of a Southside Shorty relives the confusion of these traumatic days from the point of view of Roger, a neighborhood boy who struggles to understand the senseless violence swirling through the streets around him. Awakened by the tragedy, Roger seeks out answers to difficult questions — was Yummy a killer or a victim? Was he responsible for his actions or are others to blame?

G. Neri…

has been a filmmaker, animator, teacher, and digital media producer. He currently writes full-time and lives on the Gulf coast of Florida with his wife and daughter.

— 2 days ago with 35 notes
#black authors  #g. neri  #young adult  #graphic novel  #gang violence 

Quilt Alphabet

From apples to cows, kettles to scarecrows, warm country images abound in this delightful alphabet poem

Quilt Counting

Brilliant quilt capturing the color of life on the farm, gently rhythmic text, homespun illustrations are sewn together to create the perfect companion to Quilt Alphabet

Lesa Cline-Ransome & James E. Ransome

Lesa Cline-Ransome is the author of several books for children including the award winning Satchel Paige and Major Taylor Champion Cyclist, both illustrated by her husband, James Ransome. A graduate of the Pratt Institute, she holds a Master’s Degree in Early Childhood and Elementary Education from NYU.

James Ransome’s highly acclaimed illustrations for Let My People Go won the NAACP Image Award. His other award-winning titles include Coretta Scott King Honor Book Uncle Jed’s Barbershop by Margaree King Mitchell, Deborah Hopkinson’s Under the Quilt of Night, and Satchel Paige, written by his wife, Lesa Cline-Ransome. Mr. Ransome teaches illustration at Syracuse University.

— 2 days ago with 7 notes
#black authors  #children's books  #lesa cline ransome  #james e ransome  #alphabet  #counting 

The Legend of Africania
Dorothy W. Robinson
An allegorical tale of Africa’s struggle against the ravishment of its people and country.
 

The Legend of Africania

Dorothy W. Robinson

An allegorical tale of Africa’s struggle against the ravishment of its people and country.

 

— 2 days ago with 18 notes
#black authors  #children's books  #dorothy w. robinson 

My Cold Plum Lemon Pie Bluesy Mood

Tameka Fryer Brown

What color is your mood?

On a really good day, Jamie feels purple like the first bite of a juicy cold plum.

And with a crayon in his hand, Jamie eases into a green feeling—like a dragon dancing through a jungle made of green Jell-O.   But when his brothers push him around and make fun of his drawings, Jamie feels like a dark gray storm brewing.   What will it take to put Jamie back in a bright-feeling mood?   Through Jamie, young readers will learn to describe how they’re feeling in a unique way.

My Cold Plum Lemon Pie Bluesy Mood is a 2014 Charlotte Zolotow Honor Book

“Since my children and I LOVE to read picture books, I thought that would be a great type of writing for me to learn. I studied and practiced, and studied and practiced some more. Finally, all my hard work and practice paid off… I sold a book!”Tameka Fryer Brown

— 5 days ago with 22 notes
#black authors  #tameka fryer brown  #children's books  #moods and feelings 
youngblackandvegan:

accras:

queensphynxe:

She just stared for the longest time.

OMG…I love this. This is important.

v important! representation matters more than words can express
but this picture about sums it up :)

youngblackandvegan:

accras:

queensphynxe:

She just stared for the longest time.

OMG…I love this. This is important.

v important! representation matters more than words can express

but this picture about sums it up :)

(via queendarthzannah)

— 6 days ago with 19223 notes

Double Vals: The Keys to Success in College and Life Beyond
 Discover the practical yet powerful keys that will guide you to exceptional grades, exemplary balance, and extraordinary life-fulfillment Entering Spelman College as nervous, doubtful freshmen, Kirstie and Kristie Bronner never imagined what would become of their journey-that they would make history…Like many college students, they experienced stress, discouragement, and overwhelming longing to fast-forward to the moment they would dance across the platform with their diplomas in-hand! 
They were not in love with school, neither were they Einsteins. Their secret was not found in genius, but in exceptional habits and hard work! This means that their story of academic preeminence and life success can become yours!  You’ll gain the keys to: • Study tips that work miracles • Time management that makes you a master of minutes  • Scheduling that conquers busyness • Relationships that boost your GPA • Perspective that redirects your focus • Excellence that causes you to stand out • Risks that you should take • Balanced living that yields holistic health • Classroom miracles that drop your jaw • School lessons that transfer to life lessons 
Kirstie and Kristie Bronner…
Were the first twins to ever graduate as co-valedictorians from [Spelman]. The Bronner twins both scored perfect 4.0 GPAs. Spelman was also the alma mater of their mother and grandmother. Since then, the girls have been busy forging careers as youth pastors…continue reading.

Double Vals: The Keys to Success in College and Life Beyond


Discover the practical yet powerful keys that will guide you to exceptional grades, exemplary balance, and extraordinary life-fulfillment

Entering Spelman College as nervous, doubtful freshmen, Kirstie and Kristie Bronner never imagined what would become of their journey-that they would make history…Like many college students, they experienced stress, discouragement, and overwhelming longing to fast-forward to the moment they would dance across the platform with their diplomas in-hand!

They were not in love with school, neither were they Einsteins.

Their secret was not found in genius, but in exceptional habits and hard work! This means that their story of academic preeminence and life success can become yours!

You’ll gain the keys to:
• Study tips that work miracles
• Time management that makes you a master of minutes
• Scheduling that conquers busyness
• Relationships that boost your GPA
• Perspective that redirects your focus
• Excellence that causes you to stand out
• Risks that you should take
• Balanced living that yields holistic health
• Classroom miracles that drop your jaw
• School lessons that transfer to life lessons

Kirstie and Kristie Bronner…

Were the first twins to ever graduate as co-valedictorians from [Spelman]. The Bronner twins both scored perfect 4.0 GPAs. Spelman was also the alma mater of their mother and grandmother. Since then, the girls have been busy forging careers as youth pastors…continue reading.

— 6 days ago with 83 notes
#black authors  #kirstie and kristie bronner  #double vals  #black excellence